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Theorem List for Intuitionistic Logic Explorer - 8501-8600   *Has distinct variable group(s)
TypeLabelDescription
Statement
 
Theoremuzaddcl 8501 Addition closure law for an upper set of integers. (Contributed by NM, 4-Jun-2006.)
((𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) ∧ 𝐾 ∈ ℕ0) → (𝑁 + 𝐾) ∈ (ℤ𝑀))
 
Theoremnn0pzuz 8502 The sum of a nonnegative integer and an integer is an integer greater than or equal to that integer. (Contributed by Alexander van der Vekens, 3-Oct-2018.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ0𝑍 ∈ ℤ) → (𝑁 + 𝑍) ∈ (ℤ𝑍))
 
Theoremuzind4 8503* Induction on the upper set of integers that starts at an integer 𝑀. The first four hypotheses give us the substitution instances we need, and the last two are the basis and the induction step. (Contributed by NM, 7-Sep-2005.)
(𝑗 = 𝑀 → (𝜑𝜓))    &   (𝑗 = 𝑘 → (𝜑𝜒))    &   (𝑗 = (𝑘 + 1) → (𝜑𝜃))    &   (𝑗 = 𝑁 → (𝜑𝜏))    &   (𝑀 ∈ ℤ → 𝜓)    &   (𝑘 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → (𝜒𝜃))       (𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → 𝜏)
 
Theoremuzind4ALT 8504* Induction on the upper set of integers that starts at an integer 𝑀. The last four hypotheses give us the substitution instances we need; the first two are the basis and the induction step. Either uzind4 8503 or uzind4ALT 8504 may be used; see comment for nnind 7906. (Contributed by NM, 7-Sep-2005.) (New usage is discouraged.) (Proof modification is discouraged.)
(𝑀 ∈ ℤ → 𝜓)    &   (𝑘 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → (𝜒𝜃))    &   (𝑗 = 𝑀 → (𝜑𝜓))    &   (𝑗 = 𝑘 → (𝜑𝜒))    &   (𝑗 = (𝑘 + 1) → (𝜑𝜃))    &   (𝑗 = 𝑁 → (𝜑𝜏))       (𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → 𝜏)
 
Theoremuzind4s 8505* Induction on the upper set of integers that starts at an integer 𝑀, using explicit substitution. The hypotheses are the basis and the induction step. (Contributed by NM, 4-Nov-2005.)
(𝑀 ∈ ℤ → [𝑀 / 𝑘]𝜑)    &   (𝑘 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → (𝜑[(𝑘 + 1) / 𝑘]𝜑))       (𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → [𝑁 / 𝑘]𝜑)
 
Theoremuzind4s2 8506* Induction on the upper set of integers that starts at an integer 𝑀, using explicit substitution. The hypotheses are the basis and the induction step. Use this instead of uzind4s 8505 when 𝑗 and 𝑘 must be distinct in [(𝑘 + 1) / 𝑗]𝜑. (Contributed by NM, 16-Nov-2005.)
(𝑀 ∈ ℤ → [𝑀 / 𝑗]𝜑)    &   (𝑘 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → ([𝑘 / 𝑗]𝜑[(𝑘 + 1) / 𝑗]𝜑))       (𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → [𝑁 / 𝑗]𝜑)
 
Theoremuzind4i 8507* Induction on the upper integers that start at 𝑀. The first hypothesis specifies the lower bound, the next four give us the substitution instances we need, and the last two are the basis and the induction step. (Contributed by NM, 4-Sep-2005.)
𝑀 ∈ ℤ    &   (𝑗 = 𝑀 → (𝜑𝜓))    &   (𝑗 = 𝑘 → (𝜑𝜒))    &   (𝑗 = (𝑘 + 1) → (𝜑𝜃))    &   (𝑗 = 𝑁 → (𝜑𝜏))    &   𝜓    &   (𝑘 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → (𝜒𝜃))       (𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀) → 𝜏)
 
Theoremindstr 8508* Strong Mathematical Induction for positive integers (inference schema). (Contributed by NM, 17-Aug-2001.)
(𝑥 = 𝑦 → (𝜑𝜓))    &   (𝑥 ∈ ℕ → (∀𝑦 ∈ ℕ (𝑦 < 𝑥𝜓) → 𝜑))       (𝑥 ∈ ℕ → 𝜑)
 
Theoremeluznn0 8509 Membership in a nonnegative upper set of integers implies membership in 0. (Contributed by Paul Chapman, 22-Jun-2011.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ0𝑀 ∈ (ℤ𝑁)) → 𝑀 ∈ ℕ0)
 
Theoremeluznn 8510 Membership in a positive upper set of integers implies membership in . (Contributed by JJ, 1-Oct-2018.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝑀 ∈ (ℤ𝑁)) → 𝑀 ∈ ℕ)
 
Theoremeluz2b1 8511 Two ways to say "an integer greater than or equal to 2." (Contributed by Paul Chapman, 23-Nov-2012.)
(𝑁 ∈ (ℤ‘2) ↔ (𝑁 ∈ ℤ ∧ 1 < 𝑁))
 
Theoremeluz2b2 8512 Two ways to say "an integer greater than or equal to 2." (Contributed by Paul Chapman, 23-Nov-2012.)
(𝑁 ∈ (ℤ‘2) ↔ (𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ 1 < 𝑁))
 
Theoremeluz2b3 8513 Two ways to say "an integer greater than or equal to 2." (Contributed by Paul Chapman, 23-Nov-2012.)
(𝑁 ∈ (ℤ‘2) ↔ (𝑁 ∈ ℕ ∧ 𝑁 ≠ 1))
 
Theoremuz2m1nn 8514 One less than an integer greater than or equal to 2 is a positive integer. (Contributed by Paul Chapman, 17-Nov-2012.)
(𝑁 ∈ (ℤ‘2) → (𝑁 − 1) ∈ ℕ)
 
Theorem1nuz2 8515 1 is not in (ℤ‘2). (Contributed by Paul Chapman, 21-Nov-2012.)
¬ 1 ∈ (ℤ‘2)
 
Theoremelnn1uz2 8516 A positive integer is either 1 or greater than or equal to 2. (Contributed by Paul Chapman, 17-Nov-2012.)
(𝑁 ∈ ℕ ↔ (𝑁 = 1 ∨ 𝑁 ∈ (ℤ‘2)))
 
Theoremuz2mulcl 8517 Closure of multiplication of integers greater than or equal to 2. (Contributed by Paul Chapman, 26-Oct-2012.)
((𝑀 ∈ (ℤ‘2) ∧ 𝑁 ∈ (ℤ‘2)) → (𝑀 · 𝑁) ∈ (ℤ‘2))
 
Theoremindstr2 8518* Strong Mathematical Induction for positive integers (inference schema). The first two hypotheses give us the substitution instances we need; the last two are the basis and the induction step. (Contributed by Paul Chapman, 21-Nov-2012.)
(𝑥 = 1 → (𝜑𝜒))    &   (𝑥 = 𝑦 → (𝜑𝜓))    &   𝜒    &   (𝑥 ∈ (ℤ‘2) → (∀𝑦 ∈ ℕ (𝑦 < 𝑥𝜓) → 𝜑))       (𝑥 ∈ ℕ → 𝜑)
 
Theoremeluzdc 8519 Membership of an integer in an upper set of integers is decidable. (Contributed by Jim Kingdon, 18-Apr-2020.)
((𝑀 ∈ ℤ ∧ 𝑁 ∈ ℤ) → DECID 𝑁 ∈ (ℤ𝑀))
 
Theoremublbneg 8520* The image under negation of a bounded-above set of reals is bounded below. (Contributed by Paul Chapman, 21-Mar-2011.)
(∃𝑥 ∈ ℝ ∀𝑦𝐴 𝑦𝑥 → ∃𝑥 ∈ ℝ ∀𝑦 ∈ {𝑧 ∈ ℝ ∣ -𝑧𝐴}𝑥𝑦)
 
Theoremeqreznegel 8521* Two ways to express the image under negation of a set of integers. (Contributed by Paul Chapman, 21-Mar-2011.)
(𝐴 ⊆ ℤ → {𝑧 ∈ ℝ ∣ -𝑧𝐴} = {𝑧 ∈ ℤ ∣ -𝑧𝐴})
 
Theoremnegm 8522* The image under negation of an inhabited set of reals is inhabited. (Contributed by Jim Kingdon, 10-Apr-2020.)
((𝐴 ⊆ ℝ ∧ ∃𝑥 𝑥𝐴) → ∃𝑦 𝑦 ∈ {𝑧 ∈ ℝ ∣ -𝑧𝐴})
 
Theoremlbzbi 8523* If a set of reals is bounded below, it is bounded below by an integer. (Contributed by Paul Chapman, 21-Mar-2011.)
(𝐴 ⊆ ℝ → (∃𝑥 ∈ ℝ ∀𝑦𝐴 𝑥𝑦 ↔ ∃𝑥 ∈ ℤ ∀𝑦𝐴 𝑥𝑦))
 
Theoremnn01to3 8524 A (nonnegative) integer between 1 and 3 must be 1, 2 or 3. (Contributed by Alexander van der Vekens, 13-Sep-2018.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ0 ∧ 1 ≤ 𝑁𝑁 ≤ 3) → (𝑁 = 1 ∨ 𝑁 = 2 ∨ 𝑁 = 3))
 
Theoremnn0ge2m1nnALT 8525 Alternate proof of nn0ge2m1nn 8214: If a nonnegative integer is greater than or equal to two, the integer decreased by 1 is a positive integer. This version is proved using eluz2 8451, a theorem for upper sets of integers, which are defined later than the positive and nonnegative integers. This proof is, however, much shorter than the proof of nn0ge2m1nn 8214. (Contributed by Alexander van der Vekens, 1-Aug-2018.) (New usage is discouraged.) (Proof modification is discouraged.)
((𝑁 ∈ ℕ0 ∧ 2 ≤ 𝑁) → (𝑁 − 1) ∈ ℕ)
 
3.4.11  Rational numbers (as a subset of complex numbers)
 
Syntaxcq 8526 Extend class notation to include the class of rationals.
class
 
Definitiondf-q 8527 Define the set of rational numbers. Based on definition of rationals in [Apostol] p. 22. See elq 8529 for the relation "is rational." (Contributed by NM, 8-Jan-2002.)
ℚ = ( / “ (ℤ × ℕ))
 
Theoremdivfnzn 8528 Division restricted to ℤ × ℕ is a function. Given excluded middle, it would be easy to prove this for ℂ × (ℂ ∖ {0}). The key difference is that an element of is apart from zero, whereas being an element of ℂ ∖ {0} implies being not equal to zero. (Contributed by Jim Kingdon, 19-Mar-2020.)
( / ↾ (ℤ × ℕ)) Fn (ℤ × ℕ)
 
Theoremelq 8529* Membership in the set of rationals. (Contributed by NM, 8-Jan-2002.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 28-Jan-2014.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℚ ↔ ∃𝑥 ∈ ℤ ∃𝑦 ∈ ℕ 𝐴 = (𝑥 / 𝑦))
 
Theoremqmulz 8530* If 𝐴 is rational, then some integer multiple of it is an integer. (Contributed by NM, 7-Nov-2008.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 22-Jul-2014.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℚ → ∃𝑥 ∈ ℕ (𝐴 · 𝑥) ∈ ℤ)
 
Theoremznq 8531 The ratio of an integer and a positive integer is a rational number. (Contributed by NM, 12-Jan-2002.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℤ ∧ 𝐵 ∈ ℕ) → (𝐴 / 𝐵) ∈ ℚ)
 
Theoremqre 8532 A rational number is a real number. (Contributed by NM, 14-Nov-2002.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℚ → 𝐴 ∈ ℝ)
 
Theoremzq 8533 An integer is a rational number. (Contributed by NM, 9-Jan-2002.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℤ → 𝐴 ∈ ℚ)
 
Theoremzssq 8534 The integers are a subset of the rationals. (Contributed by NM, 9-Jan-2002.)
ℤ ⊆ ℚ
 
Theoremnn0ssq 8535 The nonnegative integers are a subset of the rationals. (Contributed by NM, 31-Jul-2004.)
0 ⊆ ℚ
 
Theoremnnssq 8536 The positive integers are a subset of the rationals. (Contributed by NM, 31-Jul-2004.)
ℕ ⊆ ℚ
 
Theoremqssre 8537 The rationals are a subset of the reals. (Contributed by NM, 9-Jan-2002.)
ℚ ⊆ ℝ
 
Theoremqsscn 8538 The rationals are a subset of the complex numbers. (Contributed by NM, 2-Aug-2004.)
ℚ ⊆ ℂ
 
Theoremqex 8539 The set of rational numbers exists. (Contributed by NM, 30-Jul-2004.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 17-Nov-2014.)
ℚ ∈ V
 
Theoremnnq 8540 A positive integer is rational. (Contributed by NM, 17-Nov-2004.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℕ → 𝐴 ∈ ℚ)
 
Theoremqcn 8541 A rational number is a complex number. (Contributed by NM, 2-Aug-2004.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℚ → 𝐴 ∈ ℂ)
 
Theoremqaddcl 8542 Closure of addition of rationals. (Contributed by NM, 1-Aug-2004.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℚ ∧ 𝐵 ∈ ℚ) → (𝐴 + 𝐵) ∈ ℚ)
 
Theoremqnegcl 8543 Closure law for the negative of a rational. (Contributed by NM, 2-Aug-2004.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 15-Sep-2014.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℚ → -𝐴 ∈ ℚ)
 
Theoremqmulcl 8544 Closure of multiplication of rationals. (Contributed by NM, 1-Aug-2004.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℚ ∧ 𝐵 ∈ ℚ) → (𝐴 · 𝐵) ∈ ℚ)
 
Theoremqsubcl 8545 Closure of subtraction of rationals. (Contributed by NM, 2-Aug-2004.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℚ ∧ 𝐵 ∈ ℚ) → (𝐴𝐵) ∈ ℚ)
 
Theoremqapne 8546 Apartness is equivalent to not equal for rationals. (Contributed by Jim Kingdon, 20-Mar-2020.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℚ ∧ 𝐵 ∈ ℚ) → (𝐴 # 𝐵𝐴𝐵))
 
Theoremqreccl 8547 Closure of reciprocal of rationals. (Contributed by NM, 3-Aug-2004.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℚ ∧ 𝐴 ≠ 0) → (1 / 𝐴) ∈ ℚ)
 
Theoremqdivcl 8548 Closure of division of rationals. (Contributed by NM, 3-Aug-2004.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℚ ∧ 𝐵 ∈ ℚ ∧ 𝐵 ≠ 0) → (𝐴 / 𝐵) ∈ ℚ)
 
Theoremqrevaddcl 8549 Reverse closure law for addition of rationals. (Contributed by NM, 2-Aug-2004.)
(𝐵 ∈ ℚ → ((𝐴 ∈ ℂ ∧ (𝐴 + 𝐵) ∈ ℚ) ↔ 𝐴 ∈ ℚ))
 
Theoremnnrecq 8550 The reciprocal of a positive integer is rational. (Contributed by NM, 17-Nov-2004.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℕ → (1 / 𝐴) ∈ ℚ)
 
Theoremirradd 8551 The sum of an irrational number and a rational number is irrational. (Contributed by NM, 7-Nov-2008.)
((𝐴 ∈ (ℝ ∖ ℚ) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ ℚ) → (𝐴 + 𝐵) ∈ (ℝ ∖ ℚ))
 
Theoremirrmul 8552 The product of a real which is not rational with a nonzero rational is not rational. Note that by "not rational" we mean the negation of "is rational" (whereas "irrational" is often defined to mean apart from any rational number - given excluded middle these two definitions would be equivalent). (Contributed by NM, 7-Nov-2008.)
((𝐴 ∈ (ℝ ∖ ℚ) ∧ 𝐵 ∈ ℚ ∧ 𝐵 ≠ 0) → (𝐴 · 𝐵) ∈ (ℝ ∖ ℚ))
 
3.4.12  Complex numbers as pairs of reals
 
Theoremcnref1o 8553* There is a natural one-to-one mapping from (ℝ × ℝ) to , where we map 𝑥, 𝑦 to (𝑥 + (i · 𝑦)). In our construction of the complex numbers, this is in fact our definition of (see df-c 6876), but in the axiomatic treatment we can only show that there is the expected mapping between these two sets. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 16-Jun-2013.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 17-Feb-2014.)
𝐹 = (𝑥 ∈ ℝ, 𝑦 ∈ ℝ ↦ (𝑥 + (i · 𝑦)))       𝐹:(ℝ × ℝ)–1-1-onto→ℂ
 
3.5  Order sets
 
3.5.1  Positive reals (as a subset of complex numbers)
 
Syntaxcrp 8554 Extend class notation to include the class of positive reals.
class +
 
Definitiondf-rp 8555 Define the set of positive reals. Definition of positive numbers in [Apostol] p. 20. (Contributed by NM, 27-Oct-2007.)
+ = {𝑥 ∈ ℝ ∣ 0 < 𝑥}
 
Theoremelrp 8556 Membership in the set of positive reals. (Contributed by NM, 27-Oct-2007.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℝ+ ↔ (𝐴 ∈ ℝ ∧ 0 < 𝐴))
 
Theoremelrpii 8557 Membership in the set of positive reals. (Contributed by NM, 23-Feb-2008.)
𝐴 ∈ ℝ    &   0 < 𝐴       𝐴 ∈ ℝ+
 
Theorem1rp 8558 1 is a positive real. (Contributed by Jeff Hankins, 23-Nov-2008.)
1 ∈ ℝ+
 
Theorem2rp 8559 2 is a positive real. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 28-May-2016.)
2 ∈ ℝ+
 
Theoremrpre 8560 A positive real is a real. (Contributed by NM, 27-Oct-2007.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℝ+𝐴 ∈ ℝ)
 
Theoremrpxr 8561 A positive real is an extended real. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 21-Aug-2015.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℝ+𝐴 ∈ ℝ*)
 
Theoremrpcn 8562 A positive real is a complex number. (Contributed by NM, 11-Nov-2008.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℝ+𝐴 ∈ ℂ)
 
Theoremnnrp 8563 A positive integer is a positive real. (Contributed by NM, 28-Nov-2008.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℕ → 𝐴 ∈ ℝ+)
 
Theoremrpssre 8564 The positive reals are a subset of the reals. (Contributed by NM, 24-Feb-2008.)
+ ⊆ ℝ
 
Theoremrpgt0 8565 A positive real is greater than zero. (Contributed by FL, 27-Dec-2007.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℝ+ → 0 < 𝐴)
 
Theoremrpge0 8566 A positive real is greater than or equal to zero. (Contributed by NM, 22-Feb-2008.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℝ+ → 0 ≤ 𝐴)
 
Theoremrpregt0 8567 A positive real is a positive real number. (Contributed by NM, 11-Nov-2008.) (Revised by Mario Carneiro, 31-Jan-2014.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℝ+ → (𝐴 ∈ ℝ ∧ 0 < 𝐴))
 
Theoremrprege0 8568 A positive real is a nonnegative real number. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 31-Jan-2014.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℝ+ → (𝐴 ∈ ℝ ∧ 0 ≤ 𝐴))
 
Theoremrpne0 8569 A positive real is nonzero. (Contributed by NM, 18-Jul-2008.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℝ+𝐴 ≠ 0)
 
Theoremrpap0 8570 A positive real is apart from zero. (Contributed by Jim Kingdon, 22-Mar-2020.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℝ+𝐴 # 0)
 
Theoremrprene0 8571 A positive real is a nonzero real number. (Contributed by NM, 11-Nov-2008.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℝ+ → (𝐴 ∈ ℝ ∧ 𝐴 ≠ 0))
 
Theoremrpreap0 8572 A positive real is a real number apart from zero. (Contributed by Jim Kingdon, 22-Mar-2020.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℝ+ → (𝐴 ∈ ℝ ∧ 𝐴 # 0))
 
Theoremrpcnne0 8573 A positive real is a nonzero complex number. (Contributed by NM, 11-Nov-2008.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℝ+ → (𝐴 ∈ ℂ ∧ 𝐴 ≠ 0))
 
Theoremrpcnap0 8574 A positive real is a complex number apart from zero. (Contributed by Jim Kingdon, 22-Mar-2020.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℝ+ → (𝐴 ∈ ℂ ∧ 𝐴 # 0))
 
Theoremralrp 8575 Quantification over positive reals. (Contributed by NM, 12-Feb-2008.)
(∀𝑥 ∈ ℝ+ 𝜑 ↔ ∀𝑥 ∈ ℝ (0 < 𝑥𝜑))
 
Theoremrexrp 8576 Quantification over positive reals. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 21-May-2014.)
(∃𝑥 ∈ ℝ+ 𝜑 ↔ ∃𝑥 ∈ ℝ (0 < 𝑥𝜑))
 
Theoremrpaddcl 8577 Closure law for addition of positive reals. Part of Axiom 7 of [Apostol] p. 20. (Contributed by NM, 27-Oct-2007.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℝ+𝐵 ∈ ℝ+) → (𝐴 + 𝐵) ∈ ℝ+)
 
Theoremrpmulcl 8578 Closure law for multiplication of positive reals. Part of Axiom 7 of [Apostol] p. 20. (Contributed by NM, 27-Oct-2007.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℝ+𝐵 ∈ ℝ+) → (𝐴 · 𝐵) ∈ ℝ+)
 
Theoremrpdivcl 8579 Closure law for division of positive reals. (Contributed by FL, 27-Dec-2007.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℝ+𝐵 ∈ ℝ+) → (𝐴 / 𝐵) ∈ ℝ+)
 
Theoremrpreccl 8580 Closure law for reciprocation of positive reals. (Contributed by Jeff Hankins, 23-Nov-2008.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℝ+ → (1 / 𝐴) ∈ ℝ+)
 
Theoremrphalfcl 8581 Closure law for half of a positive real. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 31-Jan-2014.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℝ+ → (𝐴 / 2) ∈ ℝ+)
 
Theoremrpgecl 8582 A number greater or equal to a positive real is positive real. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 28-May-2016.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℝ+𝐵 ∈ ℝ ∧ 𝐴𝐵) → 𝐵 ∈ ℝ+)
 
Theoremrphalflt 8583 Half of a positive real is less than the original number. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 21-May-2014.)
(𝐴 ∈ ℝ+ → (𝐴 / 2) < 𝐴)
 
Theoremrerpdivcl 8584 Closure law for division of a real by a positive real. (Contributed by NM, 10-Nov-2008.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℝ ∧ 𝐵 ∈ ℝ+) → (𝐴 / 𝐵) ∈ ℝ)
 
Theoremge0p1rp 8585 A nonnegative number plus one is a positive number. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 5-Oct-2015.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℝ ∧ 0 ≤ 𝐴) → (𝐴 + 1) ∈ ℝ+)
 
Theoremrpnegap 8586 Either a real apart from zero or its negation is a positive real, but not both. (Contributed by Jim Kingdon, 23-Mar-2020.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℝ ∧ 𝐴 # 0) → (𝐴 ∈ ℝ+ ⊻ -𝐴 ∈ ℝ+))
 
Theorem0nrp 8587 Zero is not a positive real. Axiom 9 of [Apostol] p. 20. (Contributed by NM, 27-Oct-2007.)
¬ 0 ∈ ℝ+
 
Theoremltsubrp 8588 Subtracting a positive real from another number decreases it. (Contributed by FL, 27-Dec-2007.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℝ ∧ 𝐵 ∈ ℝ+) → (𝐴𝐵) < 𝐴)
 
Theoremltaddrp 8589 Adding a positive number to another number increases it. (Contributed by FL, 27-Dec-2007.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℝ ∧ 𝐵 ∈ ℝ+) → 𝐴 < (𝐴 + 𝐵))
 
Theoremdifrp 8590 Two ways to say one number is less than another. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 21-May-2014.)
((𝐴 ∈ ℝ ∧ 𝐵 ∈ ℝ) → (𝐴 < 𝐵 ↔ (𝐵𝐴) ∈ ℝ+))
 
Theoremelrpd 8591 Membership in the set of positive reals. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 28-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℝ)    &   (𝜑 → 0 < 𝐴)       (𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℝ+)
 
Theoremnnrpd 8592 A positive integer is a positive real. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 28-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℕ)       (𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℝ+)
 
Theoremrpred 8593 A positive real is a real. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 28-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℝ+)       (𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℝ)
 
Theoremrpxrd 8594 A positive real is an extended real. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 28-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℝ+)       (𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℝ*)
 
Theoremrpcnd 8595 A positive real is a complex number. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 28-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℝ+)       (𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℂ)
 
Theoremrpgt0d 8596 A positive real is greater than zero. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 28-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℝ+)       (𝜑 → 0 < 𝐴)
 
Theoremrpge0d 8597 A positive real is greater than or equal to zero. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 28-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℝ+)       (𝜑 → 0 ≤ 𝐴)
 
Theoremrpne0d 8598 A positive real is nonzero. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 28-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℝ+)       (𝜑𝐴 ≠ 0)
 
Theoremrpap0d 8599 A positive real is apart from zero. (Contributed by Jim Kingdon, 28-Jul-2021.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℝ+)       (𝜑𝐴 # 0)
 
Theoremrpregt0d 8600 A positive real is real and greater than zero. (Contributed by Mario Carneiro, 28-May-2016.)
(𝜑𝐴 ∈ ℝ+)       (𝜑 → (𝐴 ∈ ℝ ∧ 0 < 𝐴))
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